Pokémon Scarlet And Violet Pokedex: All The Confirmed Monsters

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A piece of art showing off the new characters, starters and legendaries in Scarlet & Violet.

Image: The Pokémon Company

In November, Game Freak will release Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, the ninth generation of mainline Pokémon games, due to sell a squillion copies on the Nintendo Switch. In addition to a true open-world set in a Mediterranean-inspired region, the games are set to increase the total number of Pokémon from approximately nine billion to a figure so large even Texas Instruments couldn’t calculate it.

This post was originally published on February 28, 2022. We’re keeping it updated, and republishing it today in the wake of a new wave of info about Pokémon Scarlet and Violet.

You already know about the two starters—Sprigatito, the internet’s weed cat who’s also the one I’ve called dibs on, and Fuecoco, whom some have referred to as Rough Draft Charmander—both of whom are brand-new to Pokémon. And you’ve probably already cracked wise about the two legendaries. But Pokémon Scarlet and Violet’s Pokédex is built out by a string of returning favorites and, uh, not-so-favorites from prior generations.

What follows is as close to a full accounting as possible, sourced directly from the official publicity materials for Pokémon Scarlet and Violet. In many cases, the Pokémon shown off in the trailers and in screenshots are part of evolutionary chains, implying (but not necessarily confirming) that those monsters’ earlier and later stages will also appear. In those cases, we’ve listed all the other evolutions in parentheses. All right, let’s do this: Here are all the confirmed Pokémon for Scarlet and Violet—so far.

New Pokémon in Scarlet and Violet

  • Applin, which like all edible Pokémon is creepy (Flapple, Appletun)
  • Armarouge, a warrior Pokémon with an interesting fire-psychic type makeup; exclusive to Scarlet
  • Bagon, fuck yeah!!! (Shelgon, Salamence, the best dragon-type Pokémon)
  • Blissey, a normal-type Pokémon with frankly too much HP (Happiny, Chansey)
  • Blitzle, a zebra-esque, electric-type cutie (Zebstrika)
  • Bounsweet, another grass-type bulb Pokémon meant to populate the lower-level areas (Steenee, Tsareena)
  • Bronzor, just some bit of metal that should be scrapped (Bronzong)
  • Cacnea, a creepy cactus grass and dark-type that seems to be demoted from crown-wearing royalty when it evolves (Cacturne)
  • Ceruledge, a warrior Pokémon with a been-there-done-that fire-ghost type makeup; exclusive to Violet
  • Cetitan, a chunky ice-type with big ol’ horns
  • Chewtle, a water-type turtle (Drednaw)
  • Clauncher, a shrimpy water-type Pokémon (Clawitzer)
  • Combee, a bunch of bug-flying-type bees shaped like of honeycombs (Vespiquen)
  • Cryogonal, one of just a few pure ice-type Pokémon
  • Cubchoo, an ice-type Pokémon that looks…utterly disgusting. Wipe your nose, you revolting creature (Beartic)
  • Cufant, a sickeningly adorable steel-type elephant Pokémon (Copperajah)
  • Cyclizar, a dragon-type Pokémon who’s unfortunately saddled with normal as its secondary type; you can ride it
  • Deerling, and we’re even less sure how many Deerling are in (Sawsbuck)
  • Deino, that oh-so emo dinosaur, with his all-important evos (Zweilous, Hydreigon)
  • Diglett, along with its new cousin Wiglett, is in (Dugtrio)
  • Dratini, a classic dragon-type Pokémon who only shows up as a statue in a fountain (Dragonair, Dragonite)
  • Dratini, a classic dragon-type Pokémon who only shows up as a statue in a fountain (Dragonair, Dragonite)
  • Drifloon, a ghost-flying-type nightmare (Drifblim)
  • Drowzee, that most yawn-inducing beast (Hypno)
  • Dunsparce, no one’s favorite Normal-type keeps showing up anyway
  • Eevee, a tiny normal-type pet with a ton of evolutions (Jolteon, Vaporeon, Flareon, Umbreon, Espeon, Glaceon, Leafeon, Sylveon)
  • Eiscue, and let me Eiscue if a penguin with a cube of ice for a head is something you’re OK with?
  • Farigiraf, the palindromic Girafarig can finally evolve, into a head-inside-head form
  • Fidough, a squishy fairy-type puppy made out of…bread?!
  • Finneon, now an essential part of so many TCG decks, but will you bother in-game? (Lumineon)
  • Flabébé, or as I call it, “FlabAlt-0233bAlt-0233″ (Floette, Florges)
  • Fletchling, a flying-type Pokémon that was essentially the Pidgey of Pokémon X and Y (Fletchinder, Talonflame)
  • Fomantis, a grass-type snippy bug that evolves into what humanoid experts just call Gallade 2.0 (Lurantis)
  • Fuecoco, the fire-type starter, looks like a crocodile
  • Gastly, the worst (Haunter, Gengar)
  • Goomy, the Snot-type Pokémon (Sliggoo, Goodra)
  • Grafaiai, an artist Pokémon who was teased in a frightening series of viral social media mockumentaries
  • Grimer, the sludgy goop monster made of poison, along with (Muk)
  • Growlithe, a legendary floofy guy and fire-type (Arcanine)
  • Hattrem, a psychic-type ponytail holder with a mushroom hat (Hatenna, Hatterene)
  • Hippopotas, asking us however do they come up with these names? (Hippowdon)
  • Hoppip, a grass-type Pokémon with no pupils and possibly no soul (Skiploom, Jumpluff)
  • Houndour, a canine-type Pokémon that looks, you know, like a hound (Houndoom)
  • Hydreigon, a dark and dragon-type that seems to also appear in a new white and beige colorway
  • Jigglypuff, that fan favorite, is inescapable now (Igglybuff, Wigglytuff)
  • Klawf, GIANT CRAB AHH
  • Komala, which is just the word “Koala” with an “m” in it, ffs
  • Koraidon, the legendary exclusive to Scarlet version; definitely a motorcycle
  • Larvitar, a rock-ground little dragon who’s useless until you hit level 55 (Pupitar, Tyranitar)
  • Lechonk, a normal-type, and potentially the most delicious Pokémon in history
  • Legacy Pokémon returning for Scarlet and Violet
  • Litleo, a tiresomely cute bear cub thing (Pyroar)
  • Lucario, the Super Smash Bros. fighter who was seriously nerfed for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (Riolu)
  • Magikarp, that useless flapping fish returns, but then of course, so does (Gyrados)
  • Magnemite, which ruled when it was just electric-type but is slightly less awesome now that it’s part steel-type too (Magneton, Magnezone)
  • Magnemite, which ruled when it was just electric-type but is slightly less awesome now that it’s part steel-type too (Magneton, Magnezone)
  • Makuhita, whose chest bib is not a bill, no matter how often you think it is (Hariyama)
  • Mareanie, a poison-water-type sea-beast with excellent hair, that evolves into what crustacean experts just call Cloyster 2.0 (Toxapex)
  • Mareep, an electric-type sheep who evolves into a shockingly powerful…kangaroo? (Flaffy, Ampharos)
  • Marill, that lazy-ass Pikachu knock-0ff (Azurill, Azumarill)
  • Meditite, a Pokémon with an onion for a head (Medicham)
  • Meowth, the cash-hungry normal-type cat Pokémon (Persian)
  • Miraidon, the legendary exclusive to Violet version; also definitely a motorcycle
  • Misdreavus, the cheeky ghost who’s been around since Gen 2 (Mismagius)
  • Mudbray, a ground-type donkey with not a single thought behind those eyes (Mudsdale)
  • Mukrow, a dark and flying-type with a pointy black hat (Honchkrow)
  • Murkrow, it’s a crow in a witch’s hat: fact (Honchkrow)
  • Noibat, a remembered Gen VI Pokémon, with soundwave abilities (Noivern)
  • Numel, a name that should always be said Seinfeld-style: NUMEL (Camerupt)
  • Oricorio, bloody show-off
  • Pachirisu, another monster who seems like a rejected option for a starter
  • Paldean Wooper, a “poison fish” Pokémon that’s a Paldean variant of the regular Johto Wooper, so presumably also (Quagsire)
  • Pawmi, this generation’s Pikachu knockoff (aka an electric-type mouse)
  • Petilil, a grass-type bulb Pokémon meant to populate the lower-level areas (Lilligant)
  • Phanpy, the elephant-like that makes Cufant redundant (Donphan)
  • Pikachu, because the Pokémascot is essentially mandatory at this point (Pichu, Raichu)
  • Pincurchin, yet another example of the exhaustion that must be felt when trying to come up with new Pokémon
  • Pineco, a bug-type…pinecone (Forretress)
  • Psyduck, the water-type Pokémon that needs an IV of ibuprofen (Golduck)
  • Quaxly, the water-type starter who, fiiiine, probably deserves an actual mention
  • Ralts, a psychic and fairy-type who evolves into Pokémon’s best dressed creatures (Kirlia, Gardevoir, Gallade)
  • Riolu, the one that evolves into the Super Smash Bros. fighter who was seriously nerfed for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate (Lucario)
  • Rockruff, because there has to be a path to the far better (Lycanroc)
  • Rolycoly, an absolute unit of a rock-type (Carkol, Coalossal)
  • Rookidee, whose Corviknight evo was a must in Sword & Shield (Corvisquire)
  • Rotom, a mischievous little lightbulb and ghost and electric-type
  • Sableye, that crystal-eyed goblin
  • Sandile, the desert croc, who is always about to do a burglary (Krokorok, Krockodile)
  • Scatterbug, the almost entirely forgotten Gen VI monster is back once more (Spewpa, Vivillon)
  • Scyther, Scyyyyyyyytheeeeeerrrrrrr (Scizor)
  • Seviper, a poison-type serpent who’s typically locked in blood feud with its counterpart, Zangoose
  • Shellder, the sticky-out-tongue clam Pokémon (Cloyster)
  • Shinx, a Pokémon who always seemed like it was meant to be iconic, then never was (Luxio, Luxray)
  • Shroomish, a mushroom, then mus lizard with one of the worst type combos: grass and fighting (Breloom)
  • Sinistea, but not nearly as creepy as everyday-object Pokémon, which don’t make a lick of sense (Polteageist)
  • Skiddo, a happy grass-type goat (Gogoat)
  • Skwovet, a cheeky squirrel that evolves into a cheeky squirrel (Greedent)
  • Slakoth, the laziest of the monsters, with a more vigorous teenage stage (Vigoroth, Slaking)
  • Slowpoke, a psychic-water type with pitiful speed, and its evolution, Slowbro, Slowking
  • Smoliv, a grass-type Pokémon who is small and looks like an olive
  • Sneasel, one of the coolest, though not exactly toughest, Pokémon ever (Weavile)
  • Snom, sure, it’s got a butt for a face, but it’s still so cute (Frosmoth)
  • Snorunt, who’s here, despite the warmer climes (Glalie, Froslass)
  • Snover, it’s a tree covered in snow, which is nice (Abomasnow)
  • Sprigatito, the grass-type starter, looks like a kitten
  • Starly, a flying-type Pokémon that was essentially the Pidgey of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl (Staravia, Staraptor)
  • Stonjourner, a rock-type Pokémon that’s essentially an Assassin’s Creed Valhalla set personified
  • Sudowoodo, the living tree who famously blocked the road in Pokémon Gold and Silver (Bonsly)
  • Sunkern, a grass-type sunflower (Sunflora)
  • Swablu, an airy normal-flying type who eventually evolves into a kickass dragon (Altaria)
  • Teddiursa, with its tautological name (Ursaring)
  • Torkoal, a turtle with an active volcano for a shell
  • Toxel, the electric/poison-type from the previous gen (Toxtricity)
  • Tropius, a flying dinosaur with bananas on its chin
  • Tynamo, the tiny sperm Pokémon (Eelektrik, Eelektross)
  • Venonat, a true classic, a bug-type from the original 151 (Venomoth)
  • Wiglett, not directly related to Diglett, despite similar characteristics, it’s an eel-like that lives by the sea
  • Wingull, a gull-like Pokémon saddled with perhaps the weakest type matchup: water-flying (Pelipper)
  • Wooper (Paldean form), a poisonous land-dweller
  • Zangoose, just a big, angry cat-ferret
  • Zorua, although we’re not sure if both forms will appear (Zoroark)

Right now, the exact list of Pokémon set to appear in Pokémon Scarlet and Violet is still up in flux. The Pokémon experts at Serebii report that Pokémon Home, Nintendo’s cross-game Pokémon storage service, can only facilitate transfers to and from Scarlet and Violet for Pokémon that are already available in the game. The implication there is that Pokémon Scarlet and Violet may not allow you to capture every single Pokémon from every single generation.

If Pokémon Scarlet and Violet indeed limit which Pokémon from prior games you can import, it might be be reminiscent of the cacophonous “Dexit” controversy that marred the previous mainline entries, Pokémon Sword and Shield–at least for some fans. Those games, which came out in 2019, did not include every prior Pokémon from every prior generation, meaning some trainers who’ve stuck with the series for every iteration had to leave behind teams they’ve curated for years (or decades, in some cases).

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